Now that we’ve looked at some really awesome Tommy Bahama Airstreams, let’s switch gears and look at tiny houses. It’s becoming a pretty big trend and has been growing more popular within the past five years, and we can definitely see why. This minimalist way of living has its benefits, but all good things come with a challenge! We’ll go over the pros and cons of living in a tiny house and a few tips for anyone seriously looking into making the switch.

Sure, debt free living sounds great, but are there any costs? Living in such a small space can create odd and unexpected issues, like general wear tear, random zoning laws about where you can and can’t park your tiny house, and those compost toilets.

Living tiny may sound appealing to some and downright impossible to others, but we often forget that tiny living isn’t always an option. Some have no choice because of life-changing situations. In this case, the only thing to do is sell most of your belongings and move you and what’s left of your items in a tiny house. And with your tiny house, everything else comes tiny, too. Toilets, closets, oven, cabinets, countertops.

It’s important to do your research on what kind of tiny house is right for you before you start building or buying. If you plan to pick up and travel, try to find a space that’s about 160 square feet or less. It’ll be easier to move. Another good idea is to find another person or couple who lives in a tiny house and ask for their guidance and tips. Check out The Tiny House Blog to start your research!

Living Big in Tiny Houses

The Hardest Part…

Once you decide what size tiny house is right for you, the next step is to declutter and keep only the things you can’t imagine life without. You may think it’ll be an impossible feat, but keeping your style with only a few of your belongings is easier than you think. Living tiny doesn’t mean depriving yourself of the things you love. Keep your favorite items and decorate around them.

You can add curtains, bed linens and other decorations to your tiny house based off of what you decide to keep.

Use What Wall Space You Can

A great hack for tiny houses and even RVs is to use the walls for storage. Wall shelves are a great way to give the illusion of a bigger and more open room, and it frees up floor space which can be used for seating areas. Try not to get carried away and let the shelves become cluttered, though. Having open shelves allow you to see what you have while also creating openness. You can find them on Amazon and a few furniture or craft stores. Check out this budget-friendly shelf with drawer from IKEA.

Find Multi-Functional Furniture

In order to successfully live in a tiny home, each piece of furniture or accessory should have at least two functions. For example, the space under your staircase could be used for seating, a bookshelf, a storage closet or a storage chest. And you can even use doors as pantry space when they’re open. If your bathroom door is closed, the other side could reveal space for spices and canned goods. To start using multi-functional items, try finding small kitchen appliances like this set of nesting bowls with the measurements engraved on the inside.

Decorate Your Walls Using Lighter Colors

Darker colors make spaces look smaller, and that’s the last thing you want in a tiny house! Try using a white or super light color palette. Your vision can be having white walls and maybe pastel blue curtains and linens, or you can try painting your walls a pale green and aim to have white or beige kitchen appliances. Be sure that you choose lighter wood or dark wood, too. There’s lot of options, but make sure everything is on the lighter side (unless you have a dark purple stand mixer that you just can’t let go, which we understand).

Another idea is to have a large mirror in the living space, which will open up the room. It will create the illusion that the space is larger than it actually is. Try to find one with a small trim around the edges like this one for $112.

Find a Wall Bed to Install

This will save you from having to sleep on the couch and it’ll save you tons of space. The only time you’ll need to have it down is when you’re sleeping. You can find wall beds that turn into a couch when they’re up, or you can find ones that turn into cabinets like this one.

Hang Out Outside Your Home

Living in a tiny house doesn’t give you much room and might make you feel claustrophobic sometimes, and it makes sense if you want to get out of there occasionally. If you have the space, create an area outside your tiny house that’s designated for being with friends. Or, find a space totally outside of your area, like a favorite restaurant or coffee house.

Whether it’s an option or not, tiny living will change the way you perceive life and your perception of needs. There will be a lengthy adjustment period, but once you realize you don’t truly need all your possessions, you’ll start to value experiences over items and things. So, you can absolutely live big in a tiny house once you learn to be grateful for all of life’s experiences.

Living Big in Tiny Houses

As always, come back to the RVUSA blog for the RV Tips of the Week on Monday, Travel Wednesday, and RV Tips and Tricks on Friday. Leave us a message below if you have any thoughts, memories or comments. We’d love to hear from you! If you’d like to receive our blog posts directly in your inbox, click here to join our free email list.

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