Every January 1st, people all around the world make New Year’s resolutions. Some people aim to lose weight or improve their health, while others vow to travel more or spend less money. If you’re a long-time RV owner looking for a way to change things up for 2017, RV consignment may be the way to go. Consigning  is relatively hassle-free, and can free up your budget and driveway to buy the brand new RV you’ve been dreaming about all year.

RV Consignment 101

 

Preparing Your RV

Before consigning your RV, there are a few things you can do to increase the value of your unit and make it stand out on the lot. First, clean your RV inside and out. Second, repair any minor issues such as blown light bulbs or loose hinges on cabinets or doors. Third, tune up your RV with a fresh oil change and fluid replacement. Lastly, add extra value to your RV with classic accessories such as hand towels, welcome mats, rugs, or kitchen decor.

Consignment Process

The typical consignment period for an RV is one month to 90 days. However, the goal of consigning is to sell the unit as quickly as possible at a fair price. Dealers usually charge some sort of commission for consigning your RV, such as 10 percent of the selling price. Commissions can also be based on the value of the RV and/or final selling price. Some dealers also charge a set-up fee, so be sure to ask about all costs before signing any paperwork.

Once your RV is in the hands of a consignment dealer, there are risks that you may incur. Dealer lots usually have security and/or surveillance cameras to prevent damages, vandalism, and theft. However, accidents, natural disasters, and weather could result in damage to your RV. To prevent a major inconvenience to you (and your bank account), talk to your insurance company before consigning your vehicle. Review your insurance policy with your agent to make sure your RV will be covered when it is no longer in your custody.

Dealer Services

Consigning your RV, rather than selling it yourself, takes much of the burden off your plate. Dealers offer many services that can speed up the process of

selling your RV, such as advertising, e-mail marketing, Facebook ads, and more. They also handle the paperwork, buyer phone calls, and price negotiations for you. Many consignment dealers will accept trade-ins, financing, or cash payments to help sell your RV quickly and efficiently.

Payment Process

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Once the dealer has found a buyer for your RV, the rest of the process is very simple. The dealer will inform you upon completion of the sale, and pay you for the unit. The amount you receive depends on the final selling price of the unit, as well as the commission rates and fees charged by the dealership. Once again, ask about all the fees and commission percentages up-front so there are no surprises.

After the Sale

Now that your old RV is off your hands, what do with your newfound cash is entirely up to you. If you’ve had a good experience working with your consignment dealer, you may want to browse their lot for a new vehicle that fits your current travel needs. Finding a dealership that is trustworthy and reliable can sometimes be difficult, so once you’ve found one you like, you may want to stick with them. Since you already have a relationship with someone on the staff, they will be happy to help you get behind the wheel of one of their new RVs.

If you’re looking to consign your RV, check your local dealers to find a dealer who will be willing to sell your unit. Maybe you’ve already sold your RV, and you’re ready to buy a new one. Visit www.RVUSA.com to find a new or used RV that fits within your budget. With an old RV off your hands, and a new one in the driveway, the travel possibilities for you and your family in 2017 are endless. If you have any more tips about consigning, leave us a note in the comments below!

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Hi,
    I have a classic 1972 front wheel drive Revcon250 motorhome with a olds Toronado 455 engine in it. When I went an looked at it,it appeared ok. I had them deliver it.on my way back,it took 6 days to go on what would have been a 5.5 hour drive. I’m a retired elderly lady. i cannot afford to fix my motorhome anymore. They took out things,replaced things that don’t belong on her. I have had to spend everything I have and I can’t do it anymore. I’m still stranded. I need to get back to Amarillo. I’m looking for a older travel trailer. One that if it needs small repairs, that’s ok. Can you help me or know of anyone who can. I’m asking the same amount as I paid for her. $3800.
    Or would trade for a older travel trailer or older motorhome. Thank you for your time. I need to be in Amarillo no later than the third week in Feb.
    Sincerely,phoenix

    • Hi Phoenix, we are not actually an RV dealer or service shop, but we have hundreds of dealers across the country that we can connect you with. If you tell us what city you are in we can help you find some places you can get repairs. Thanks!

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